Sky to Space
Astronomy Beyond the Basics with Comparisons, Ratios and Proportions
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Links to reliable facts, figures and photos including the Moon and eclipses

Links to reliable sources of space facts, figures, and real photos

 

Look up info here. Click on each yellow title.

Each site opens in a new window. Note to parents and teachers: I have not put any links to YouTube or Wikipedia on this page.

 

Astronomy Picture of the Day

"Each day a different image of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer." If I had to recommend just one website for astronomy and space exploration, this would be it. Notice the search feature.


National Space Science Data Center's Lunar and Planetary Science page

Follow the links to fact sheets on planets and moons in our solar system, including sizes, orbits, masses and much more. For further exploration, you might try the main NSSDC page.


Eclipsewise.com

Details on the dates, times, and regions of visibility for every solar and lunar eclipse from centuries in the past to centuries in the future. Astronomer Fred Espenak did the eclipse calculations for NASA before he retired. Now he's still presenting eclipse data here.


Greatamericaneclipse.com

Beautiful maps and visualizations by cartographer Michael Zeiler. Originally concentrating on the 2017 eclipse, but now including maps to prepare for April 8, 2024. 


NASA's Exoplanet Exploration page

We now know about so many planets orbiting other stars that it's hard to find information in easy-to-understand form. This NASA page provides easy links. Find the link to the "New Worlds Atlas" to look up information on a particular exoplanet.


NASA/JPL Planetary Photojournal

This page connects to countless thousands of photos taken by NASA space missions over the last 50-plus years, especially missions to other planets directed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. When I was your age (and you can guess what that might mean), we had to write letters to NASA and hope they would mail some pictures to us. Now, the pictures are all here, free to download. But be prepared to spend some time searching. Or, for a quick start, find and click on the "latest images" link.